Diabetes Task Force Solutions

Sharing knowledge and expriences

AMA head Madera: most ehealth apps are digital snake oil

Excellent presentation, the only thing missing is the patient involvement if the tool targeting chro

Excellent presentation, the only thing missing is the patient involvement if the tool targeting chronic diseases care.

http://www.ictandhealth.com/news/newsitem/article/AMA-head-Madera-most-ehealth-apps-are-digital-snake-oil.html

Live Well with Diabetes

Diabetes is nothing to be ashamed of. There is no blame. The diagnosis of diabetes is a turning poin

Diabetes is nothing to be ashamed of. There is no blame. The diagnosis of diabetes is a turning point in our lives and we have the choice to decide the path we will take with it. Let it be a wake-up call to a healthier, energetic life. A life embracing balance, wise food choices and plenty of physical activity is a life well lived.

Over time diabetes can change just as our bodies change as we get older. Sometimes it is difficult to stick with our diabetes management program as a result of boredom, or the simple fact that what we are doing is no longer working for us. At times like these we need to be creative and seek alternatives. This may mean alternative foods or activities. New or different activities can often provide the spark that helps us to feel alive again and sustain the strength that we need to continue to manage our diabetes just as well as ever. Don’t be afraid to seek out guidance if you need it. Guidance can come from a diabetes nurse educator, a dietician, your doctor, your spouse or a close friend. 

Please visit Live Well with Diabetes

Diabetes and indigenous people

According to the International Diabetes federation, “Currently there are 370 million indigenou

According to the International Diabetes federation, “Currently there are 370 million indigenous people worldwide, representing 5% of the world’s population. While the percentage of indigenous peoples is low, the burden of diabetes on indigenous peoples is undeniable. 50% of indigenous adults over 35 years of age have type 2 diabetes.”

Diabetes is reaching an epidemic stage among Aboriginal people. It is estimated that approximately 48% of the First Nations population above 45 years old in Canada have diabetes. Aboriginal children are also now being diagnosed with Type 2 diabetes, a condition that in the past occurred mainly in older persons. Through community initiatives, based on traditional holistic and western medicine integrated approaches, building trust, and respect of peoples cultures and traditions; diabetes can be prevented and managed. Empowerment through knowledge and ownership of the challenge is what Diabetes and My Nation is about. A model developed by Diabetes Task Force Solutions , the program was implemented at the Haisla First Nation. For more information please visit Diabetes and My Nation.